The United Nations Collaborative Programme
on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation
and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries
 
 
 
 

Spain becomes a donor to the UN-REDD Programme

Credits: UNDP

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Helen Clark and Spanish Secretary of State for International Cooperation, Soraya Rodriguez, signed multi-year Strategic Partnership Agreement for close to €400 million, of which €15 million was allocated to the UN-REDD Programme.

The Spanish Government became the UN-REDD Programme’s third donor last week after Norway and Denmark, by pledging €15 million (approximately US$22.5 million) to the multi-donor trust fund.

“We are very pleased with Spain’s move,” says Mr. Yemi Katerere, Head of the UN-REDD Programme Secretariat. “There is a growing interest in the UN-REDD Programme by developing and developed countries and a clear recognition that REDD cannot happen without this partnership.  Donors are recognizing the Programme’s value at a time when requests to join the Programme are increasing”.

 Donor contributions to the UN-REDD Programme go towards supporting developing countries in building their capacity and readiness for REDD+. This includes methods and tools for measuring and monitoring greenhouse gas emissions and forest carbon flows; promoting and facilitating broad-ranging consultations among stakeholders, including indigenous peoples and other forest-dependent communities; and establishing linkages with existing national programmes in the areas of governance, development, poverty reduction, food security and natural resource management.

Donor funds will also contribute to the UN-REDD Programme’s global activities, to develop common approaches, analyses and guidelines and to provide guidance and share knowledge on how to implement REDD+.

So far, six of the Programme’s nine member countries—The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Panama, Tanzania and Viet Nam—have seen their national programmes approved by the UN-REDD Programme’s Policy Board, for a total financing of US$24 million.

 
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